Tarmac ribbons criss-crossing the landscape, dusty back roads twisting between the cool shadows of ancient pines, and less traveled pathways connecting present to past, all I wander, seeking, seeing, with my keyboard and camera capturing scenes and stories to share with you.

Now in its seventh year, this venue has become an important part of my life, a place where I can express my thoughts and feelings about the things I see and do, hoping the process brings me a bit closer to friends and family who enjoy sharing my sometimes chaotic and often nonlinear observations and ideas. A journal, I suppose, but one with which I find pleasure in thinking others are alongside me on my journey.

Comments, thoughts, or just a friendly chat, use the response box below or email me at patrickgroleau@gmail.com.

December 10, 2013

RESTRAINT

... a few weeks ago, while wandering through the cemetery that sits above the messalonskee river where it flows into the the kennebec at the south end of town, i came upon this mound of leaves, one of many such the maintenance workers had formed into long piles along the cemetery lanes ...

... i became almost possessed with the overwhelming urge to run through all of the piles, my heart's most fervent desire to scatter the leaves to and fro until there would be no evidence they had ever been collected ...

... i resisted my impulse, if not out of consideration for the workers, then at least in respect of the spirits who reside amongst the headstones ...

... i was quite proud of myself for having such discipline ...
... i was even prouder of myself, however, that still i fancy such thoughts ...

SLIDE & SENSOR

... the little rectangular chip inside the square black box at the left of the circuit board is the sensor a digital camera uses to capture an image ... the film inside of the cardboard is what was used in the olden days ...
... note:  as relates to photography, other than technical reasons, it really doesn't matter which of these is behind a lens ...

... {this image, by the way, was taken using a forty year-old darkroom enlarging lens attached to a modern digital camera} ....

THE GRILL

... title says it all ...
... and, yes, once again, it seems i will take a picture of just about anything ...

AN HDR REVIST

... “hdr,” or “high dynamic range,” photography is simply the use of technical means to capture an image which has a range of light intensity from black to white that is greater than a film or sensor’s ability to capture it ... the best example would be a picture taken on a sunny day while skiing ... if the snow shows detail in the final image, the deep shadows under the trees will be completely black, or, if you can see details in the shadows, the snow will be “blown out,” pure white with no detail visible ...

... film and digital sensors capture more of the dynamic range than can be printed or displayed on a monitor ... hdr photography is a way of “compressing” the dynamic range ... there are two methods of hdr photography ... one, as old as photography itself, is to simply take several pictures of the same scene, exposing one for the highlights and one for the shadows, then combine them ... this used to be done in the darkroom, now it can be done using software ...

... another method of hdr photography is to take a single image, then using darkroom techniques or software manipulate the dynamic range so that it can expressed in a print or on a monitor ...



... or, if on a rather cold and icy day a couple of weeks before christmas you're working the counter in the bookstore and the weather has kept all the customers away, you can take a "regular" image from your folder marked "revisit" and enter into a little dance with hue and value and contrast ...

... hdr photography seems to stir great debate in the photography world ... some photographers love it, some detest it ... from my perspective, there're the same camps which used to fight over "kodachrome vs. ektachrome," "black & white vs. color," or "small vs. large format negatives" ...

... me, when i'm making a picture my hope is simply that it will be appreciated by someone else ...