Tarmac ribbons criss-crossing the landscape, dusty back roads twisting between the cool shadows of ancient pines, and less traveled pathways connecting present to past, all I wander, seeking, seeing, with my keyboard and camera capturing scenes and stories to share with you.

Now in its sixth year, this venue has become an important part of my life, a place where I can express my thoughts and feelings about the things I see and do, hoping the process brings me a bit closer to friends and family who enjoy sharing my sometimes chaotic and often nonlinear observations and ideas. A journal, I suppose, but one with which I find pleasure in thinking others are alongside me on my journey.

Comments, thoughts, or just a friendly chat, use the response box below or email me at patrickgroleau@gmail.com.

August 6, 2015

RESPONSE TO A QUESTION

... "camera" is a box ... on one side is something that can record light, film in the olden days, in these times some sort of sensor ... opposite the film/sensor is either a pinhole or a lens ...

... fancy slr ("single lens reflex) or dslr (digital single lens reflex) cameras have a mirror between the lens and the film/sensor ... this mirror allow the user to view directly through the lens ... since the mirror is quite obviously in the way of taking a picture, it must fly up out of the way after the shutter button is pressed ...

... because of the space necessary for the mirror, the distance between the film/sensor and the lens mount must be rather long ... this is the "flange-to-film/sensor" distance ...

... my new fuji is a "mirrorless" camera (i hate the term, it's actually a Digital Viewfinder camera, but those initials were already taken and the various companies couldn't come up with anything they agreed upon) ... there is nothing between the lens and the sensor ... i view through a rather nice digital viewfinder ... that viewfinder could be anywhere, even separate from the camera, but fuji decided to use the classic slr form when designing their x-t1 ...

... because there is no mirror, the x-t1 can be extremely thin ... the flange-to-sensor distance of the x-t1 is almost 1/2 that of slr/dslr cameras with their flipping mirrors ...

... soooooooooo ...

... so, this is the best part ... because lenses for other cameras have to be further away from the film/sensor—because they have much greater "flange to film/sensor" distance—it is possible to use an adapter to put them on the fuji ... all needs be done is machine a little tube that is fuji on one end, the respective lens mount on the other, and which is exactly the correct length so that the fuji's flange-to-sensor measurement plus the adapter tube equals the proper lens-to-film/flange measurement of the camera involved ... 

... here you can see the fuji x-t1 ... in order to make the camera "thick" enough so that the zuiko lens works properly, i've added a cleverly machined tube that locks into the fuji and holds the zuiko lens ...

... simple ...

... of course, with this combination i must focus the lens manually, just as we did in the olden days ... but, in return for this bit of extra work, i can purchase absolutely fabulous glass from dozens of manufacturers for 1/4th-1/10th the cost of comparable modern lenses ... (the lens pictured cost $29 on eBay ... it's in brand-new condition ... to equal its optical quality/performance with a modern autofocus lens, i would have to come up another $100-300) ...

... not a bad deal, and, as i've said, if it worked for henri cartier-bressen who am i to complain ...

TASTING WATERVILLE

... on a little outing with roger, a ride to lewiston for him to try out some motorcycling waterproof boots, i tested the "electronic shutter" feature of my new camera ... first look this doesn't seem like much, but to freeze hair blowing in a 65 mph slipstream is a bit much for a mechanical focal plain shutter, whereas the top speed of a 32,000th/sec made doing so—well, i guess you could say it made taking this picture a breeze ... !!! ...

... returning to the bookstore, in my mail i found a little box from china ... i'd wanted a mid-range lens for my fuji, but unfortunately the funds dedicated for the purchase had to be sent to the new hampshire motor vehicle department (something about a double-yellow line, as i recall) ... a moment of inspiration, however, and with a visit to the little camera museum in my living room i had in hand a classic asahi optical company super-takumar 105mm f/2.8 ... now forty years old, in its day it was of the very best of the glass produced by that famous company ... here's a first shot, hand-held, 60th/sec, i.so. 1,600 ... oh, yes, like the olympus lenses i've been using, this is a completely manual lens ...


... my front door opens onto main street, where i immediately noticed a most interesting face ...

... after closing the store i wandered the streets of waterville's annual "let's disrupt patrick's peace and quiet" evening, the "taste of waterville" for which the downtown streets are barricaded and a sort of epicurean block party takes place ... here's one of the town's well-known food service workers ...

... we used to do this, sit around on our bikes so everyone could see how cool we were ... the cell phone is a modern touch, and, way back in those olden days, we would've risked a whoopin' if any of our mothers had sounded the alarm that their offspring were appearing in public with unlaced shoes ... as for the backwards hats, i think we would've thought that a bit strange ...

... great music at the sterns centre ...

... a small child was fascinated by the leg forest through which he was being negotiated by his father ... using these old lenses slows the process, clearly, but to my recollection that didn't inhibit henri cartier-bressen ...

... an ojibwe "dream catcher" ...

... changes, so many changes ...

... out of pure joy, a child dances ... some things never change ...

... i think i'm going to enjoy using this lens ... more to come, i promise ...