Tarmac ribbons criss-crossing the landscape, dusty back roads twisting between the cool shadows of ancient pines, and less traveled pathways connecting present to past, all I wander, seeking, seeing, with my keyboard and camera capturing scenes and stories to share with you.

Now in its seventh year, this venue has become an important part of my life, a place where I can express my thoughts and feelings about the things I see and do, hoping the process brings me a bit closer to friends and family who enjoy sharing my sometimes chaotic and often nonlinear observations and ideas. A journal, I suppose, but one with which I find pleasure in thinking others are alongside me on my journey.

Comments, thoughts, or just a friendly chat, use the response box below or email me at patrickgroleau@gmail.com.

November 5, 2012

WIPEOUT

NIKON D200-SIGMA 100-300@300MM-F9-1/1000th-ISO200   
... on christmas eve or new year's day i'd take ma on a drive down to point judith ... we'd sit in the car watching the line where the cold atlantic current battles the outflow of narragansett bay, and, while we both enjoyed watching the rhode island surfers demonstrate the fortitude and grit that proves them to be of the most seriously dedicated wave riders, ma would regale me with stories from the days when she moved to cosmopolitain rhode island from the warmth and isolation of her caribbean island home ... we'd sit for awhile, never long enough as far as she was concerned, then we'd go looking for clam cakes, since, as we all know, that's one of the primary reasons g*d created the south shore ...

NOVEMBER FIREWORKS

NIKON D200-NIKKOR 18-135@70MM-F6.3-1/40th-ISO400   
... so, just as jeff probst announced, "i'll count the ballots" (yes, i admit it, but a fellow's got to keep some sort of a sense of mainstream american culture), my television exploded ... okay, perhaps that's too strong a word ... a sort of musty ozone odor, coupled with a sharp crackling noise, like water makes when you splash it into hot grease, then a brilliant flash of light from the rear of the set accompanied by a miniature thunderclap followed by a small mushroom cloud rising up behind the television ... hmmm, close enough that i'll stick to the word "exploded" ... 

... what to do ... repair people gave quotes ranging from, "oh, a couple of hundred dollars," to, "you might as well get a new television" ... one problem creates another, of course, since the thought of purchasing a new set involved deciding whether to simply replace the set (at much less than i paid for this one several years ago), or "upgrade" to a newer l.e.d. technology ... either way, was money i didn't want to spend ... sooooo ...

... so, after a bit of internet research learning it is usually the power supply that fails on flat-screen televisions, a few dozen screws removed, and almost an hour tracking down a replacement part that was located in the united states (much, much less expensive in china, but delivery times were rather vaguely promised), i decided to risk fixing the set myself ...

... kudos to "tv city" in washington state ... no postage charged, and if it hadn't been for the transportation disruption caused by the hurricane the part would have been here overnight ... having already mastered the "how the set was put together" learning curve, it only took me ten minutes to install the new power supply ... then, with a satisfying click, the television powered up good as new ... most impressive, the onboard memory retained all the channel and image settings ...

... there's probably some sort of lesson in all this, but i'll leave that to you ... mostly, i'm happy that i made an effort to live up to one of the brags my little girls used to make of me, "our dad can fix anything" ... i can't, of course, boo-boo's and broken hearts and and a legion of disappointments have proven that, but i'm happy that at least i keep trying ...