Tarmac ribbons criss-crossing the landscape, dusty back roads twisting between the cool shadows of ancient pines, and less traveled pathways connecting present to past, all I wander, seeking, seeing, with my keyboard and camera capturing scenes and stories to share with you.

Now in its seventh year, this venue has become an important part of my life, a place where I can express my thoughts and feelings about the things I see and do, hoping the process brings me a bit closer to friends and family who enjoy sharing my sometimes chaotic and often nonlinear observations and ideas. A journal, I suppose, but one with which I find pleasure in thinking others are alongside me on my journey.

Comments, thoughts, or just a friendly chat, use the response box below or email me at patrickgroleau@gmail.com.

February 10, 2013

SUED FOR BEING GRAY

NIKON D200-NIKKOR 18-135@135mm-F11-1/125th-3 FLASH-ISO100
... here's a little gem that will most likely seem a bit perplexing to photographers under the age of thirty ... this is a twin-lens reflex yashica-44 ... unlike its well-known and more complex brother, the single-lens-reflex, or "slr," a camera of this type uses one lens for viewing and another for the actual taking of the picture ... "but what's the advantage in that" ... with no moving mirror, the camera is both simpler and much more rugged ... also, because there is no mirror flipping out of the light path during exposure the photographer never suffers a momentary black-out of the viewfinder ... surprisingly, since the upper glass doesn't have to be color and aberration corrected, and the focus mount is built into the front of the camera rather than the lens barrel,  tlr lenses are not more costly than slr optics ...

... the yashica-44 used 127 roll film which resulted in huge square-format color slides that fit into a standard 35mm projector ... alas, such film is no longer produced, so unless a photographer is willing cut-down 120 film to fit 127 spools this type of camera is now good only as a curiosity ...

... so, here's my question:  why was yashica forced to stop making this camera in grey, as well as cease marketing it as the "yashica baby gray" ... first correct answer gets a prize ...




AERO COMMANDER

WITTNAUER FESTIVAL-STEINER 45MM-EKTACHROME-ISO 80
... as much as pa used to take us places, he would also find reasons to take just me with him on an outing ... sometimes it would be late in the night, when he'd been called in to the crypto vault to decode or encode some highly classified military communication ... other times, often in darkness, too, it would be to meet another of his kind for some sort of scrounging/bartering transaction ... i avoid the word "thievery," if only because i always accepted his explanation, "well, if they cared all that much they wouldn't have left it lying around" ... but in many cases i would go along to "keep him company," eventually to learn that we were going someplace that was just for me ... crawling around inside the gargantuan fuselage of an air force c-124 globemaster transport plane, the office of the president of the union pacific railroad (where in my very own hands i held one of the "golden spikes"), or, as you can see here, the inspection of an airplane of which he'd heard me express admiration ... when it was the latter there always seemed to be someone around to say, "why, you're in luck, frenchy, i just happened to have the keys with me" ...

ADRIEN'S OLYMPUS E-P3
... in 1944 ted smith and a group of douglas aircraft engineers formed a company to develop a transport plane similar in layout to the a-20 bomber ... their commander family of aircraft was manufactured from 1948 until 1986 ... it was famous for its single-engine performance and overall utility, but i liked it simply because it looked good ... last spring, while we were visiting the united states air force museum in dayton, adrien snapped this picture of me standing in front of president dwight eisenhower's personal transport ... it was the first presidential transport to sport the blue and white paint scheme, and, when the president was aboard, it was the smallest aircraft to use the "air force one" call sign ...